Steve Jobs のスピーチ( Stanford University )

以前、紹介しましたが、もう一回。和訳もつけてみました。

ただ、細かい部分は、訳していませんので、あしからず。

Steve Jobs 1955-2011
1955年2月24日 生
2011年10月5日 没 56歳
CEO, Apple and Pixar Animation
at Stanford University 2005
Stanford Report, June 14, 2005
‘You’ve got to find what you love,’ Jobs says
This is a prepared text of the Commencement address delivered by Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple Computer and of Pixar Animation Studios, on June 12, 2005.
I am honored to be with you today at your commencement from
one of the finest universities in the world.
I never graduated from college.
Truth be told, this is the closest I’ve ever gotten to a college graduation.
Today I want to tell you three stories from my life. That’s it.
No big deal. Just three stories.
この世界でも屈指の大学の卒業式にお招きいただきありがとうございます。(歓声)
本当のことを言えば、私は大学を出ていません。
今回、初めて、大学の卒業式に出席しているのです。(笑)
本日は、私に本当に起こった三つの出来事をお話します。
でも、大したことではないんです。
The first story is about connecting the dots.
I dropped out of Reed College after the first 6 months,
but then stayed around as a drop-in for another 18 months
or so before I really quit.
まず、『点と点のつながり』からお話ししましょう。
私は、リード大学を入学して半年で休学しましたが、
それから本当に退学するまでの一年半、
この大学をさまよっていました。
So why did I drop out?
It started before I was born.
My biological mother was a young,
unwed college graduate student,
and she decided to put me up for adoption.
She felt very strongly that I should be adopted by college graduates,
so everything was all set for me to be adopted at birth by a lawyer and his wife.
Except that when I popped out they decided at the last minute
that they really wanted a girl.
So my parents, who were on a waiting list, got a call in the middle of the night asking:
“We have an unexpected baby boy; do you want him?”
They said: “Of course.”
My biological mother later found out that my mother had never graduated from college
and that my father had never graduated from high school.
She refused to sign the final adoption papers.
She only relented a few months later when my parents promised
that I would someday go to college.
退学する理由はというと、私が生まれる前までさかのぼらなければいけません。
わたしの生みの親は、その当時若く、未婚でまだ大学院生でしたので私を養子として、
手放す決意をしていました。生みの母は、大学を卒業してこそ
一人前になると考えていたので、弁護士夫婦に預ける話がまとまりかけていました。
わたしがうまれる寸前になって、その弁護士夫婦は、女の子が欲しいと言い始めたのです。
結局、私が彼らに引き取られることは、ありませんでした。
そして、養子を待っていた別な夫婦が呼ばれたのです。
『ちょっと予想外に生まれてしまった男の子がいますが、いかがですか』とその夫婦に問いかけました。
『もちろんです』と彼らは答えました。
後日わかったのですが、生みの母が言うには、育ての母親になる人は、大学を中退した人で、
育ての父親になる人は、高校も卒業していませんでした。
結局、生みの親は、養子の同意書へのサインを拒否したのです。
しかし、それから数か月後に息子であるわたしを
いつの日か大学に行かせるという約束でわたしの生みの親はしぶしぶ、
養子の同意書にサインをしたのです。
これが、わたしの人生の出発点だったのです。
And 17 years later I did go to college.
But I naively chose a college that was almost as expensive as Stanford,
and all of my working-class parents’ savings were being spent on my college tuition.
After six months, I couldn’t see the value in it.
I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life
and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out.
And here I was spending all of the money my parents had saved their entire life.
So I decided to drop out and trust that it would all work out OK.
It was pretty scary at the time, but looking back it was one of the best decisions I ever made.
The minute I dropped out I could stop taking the required classes that didn’t interest me,
and begin dropping in on the ones that looked interesting.
それから、17年後、私は、大学に入学しました。
スタンフォード大学よりも月謝の高い大学を選んでしまったので、
わたしの両親の給料はすべて、私の学費に消えていったのです。
大学に入学して、半年経ち、この大学になんの価値も見出せない自分がいることに気づきました。
わたしはまだ、何をしたいか決めていませんでしたが、
この大学がなにか手助けをしてくれるとも思えませんでした。
ただただ、両親が一生懸命稼いだ金が学費へと消えていったのです。
結局、わたしは、なんとかなるだろうと思い、退学を決めたのです。
当時のわたしは、とても不安でしたが、
いま思えば、人生で最高の選択だったのです。(笑)
必修科目にしばられることなく、私は、自由に好きな授業に出席し始めたのです。
もちろん、許可なくですが。
It wasn’t all romantic.
I didn’t have a dorm room, so I slept on the floor in friends’ rooms,
I returned coke bottles for the 5¢ deposits to buy food with,
and I would walk the 7 miles across town every Sunday night to get one good meal a week
at the Hare Krishna temple. I loved it.
And much of what I stumbled into by following my curiosity
and intuition turned out to be priceless later on.
でも、ロマンチックな話ばかりではないんです。
泊まるところがなく、友達の部屋に寝泊まりしていました。
コーラの空きビンで5セントを稼いで、それを食費にあてました。
毎週日曜日の夜は、町を7マイル(約11キロ)歩いて、
おいしいごちそうをヒンズー教の教会まで食べに行きました。とっても良かったですよ。
そして、大学をやめてから、率先してやったことは、
わたしの人生において、とても価値のあるものとなったのです。
Let me give you one example:
Reed College at that time offered perhaps the best calligraphy instruction in the country.
Throughout the campus every poster, every label on every drawer,
was beautifully hand calligraphed.
Because I had dropped out and didn’t have to take the normal classes,
I decided to take a calligraphy class to learn how to do this.
I learned about serif and san serif typefaces,
about varying the amount of space between different letter combinations,
about what makes great typography great.
It was beautiful, historical, artistically subtle in a way that science can’t capture,
and I found it fascinating.
例を挙げてみましょう。
リード大学では、当時、国内で最高の西洋書道の授業があったんです。
その証拠に、大学校内のポスターや引き出しのラベルは、
すべて手書きの美しい字で飾られていました。
先にも述べましたが、自由に授業を聴講することができたので、
セリフ体、サンセリフ体などのフォントや字間、行間の調整などの
西洋書道のポイントを勉強できたのです。
そこには、美しく、伝統的で、科学では説明できない繊細さがありました。
わたしは、その美しさに惹(ひ)かれたのです。
None of this had even a hope of any practical application in my life.
But ten years later, when we were designing the first Macintosh computer,
it all came back to me. And we designed it all into the Mac.
It was the first computer with beautiful typography.
If I had never dropped in on that single course in college,
the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts.
And since Windows just copied the Mac,
it’s likely that no personal computer would have them.
If I had never dropped out,
I would have never dropped in on this calligraphy class,
and personal computers might not have the wonderful typography that they do.
Of course it was impossible to connect the dots looking forward
when I was in college. But it was very, very clear looking backwards ten years later.
私の人生において、西洋書道が役に立つとは思ってもみませんでした。
ところが、10年後、最初の Macintosh を作成したとき、
この西洋書道の知識が役立ったのです。
Mac は、世界最初の西洋書道のフォントを導入した
美しい字を書くことができる PCに なったのです。
無駄に思われるかもしれなかった
あのリード大学中退後の西洋書道の授業が
Mac のたくさんのフォントや美しい字間調整ができる PC にさせたのです。
でも、Mac を真似したWindowsには、フォントのこだわりなどありませんでしたが。(笑、拍手、歓声)
大学中退して、西洋書道の授業に紛れ込んでいなかったら、
美しいフォントをもった PC は、出現しなかったに違いありません。
もちろん、その出来事のつながりをだれも予想していませんでした。
でも、10年後、人生を振り返ってみると、
それは、明白な事実だったのです。
Again, you can’t connect the dots looking forward;
you can only connect them looking backwards.
So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future.
You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever.
This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.
もう一度、言います。
点と点のつながりを見つけ出すことは、その時はできないのが当たり前です。
人生を振り返ってみたとき、そのとき初めて、点のつながりを理解できるのです。
いま、やっていること、その点が、いつの日か、別な点につながるのです。
根性や運命、人生など、なんでもいいので、点となるものを持ってください。
その点が別な点につながると信じていれば、他の人と違う道を歩んでも、
歩き続けることができるのです。
それこそが、お互いの人生に差をつけることになるのです。
My second story is about love and loss.
I was lucky — I found what I loved to do early in life.
Woz and I started Apple in my parents’ garage when I was 20.
We worked hard, and in 10 years Apple had grown from just the two of us in a garage
into a $2 billion company with over 4000 employees.
We had just released our finest creation — the Macintosh — a year earlier,
and I had just turned 30. And then I got fired.
How can you get fired from a company you started?
Well, as Apple grew we hired someone who I thought was very talented to run the company with me,
and for the first year or so things went well.
But then our visions of the future began to diverge and eventually we had a falling out.
When we did, our Board of Directors sided with him.
So at 30 I was out. And very publicly out.
What had been the focus of my entire adult life was gone, and it was devastating.
次に、『愛と失うこと』
わたしが若い時から打ち込める仕事をみつけることができたことは、幸運でした。
二十歳のとき、友人( Woz )と両親のガレージで Apple 社を設立しました。
一生懸命働き、10年間で、2人だけだった社員が4千人に増え、
年商20億ドルの大企業に成長したのです。
最初の Macintosh を販売し始めた翌年、わたしは、30歳になっていました。
そして、わたしは、クビになったのです。
どうやったら、創設した会社をクビになるんでしょう!(笑)
わたしは、Apple 社の成長にともない、有能な人物を重役に起用しました。
はじめのうちは、よかったのですが、将来に対するビジョンがお互いに
食い違い始め、亀裂がはいったのです。
そんなとき、取締役会が味方になったのは、彼の方であり、私ではありませんでした。
そこで、わたしは、クビになったのです。しかも、かなり有名なクビでした。
人生に焦点が無くなり、絶望しました。
I really didn’t know what to do for a few months.
I felt that I had let the previous generation of entrepreneurs down
– that I had dropped the baton as it was being passed to me.
I met with David Packard and Bob Noyce and tried to apologize for screwing up so badly.
I was a very public failure, and I even thought about running away from the valley.
But something slowly began to dawn on me — I still loved what I did.
The turn of events at Apple had not changed that one bit.
I had been rejected, but I was still in love. And so I decided to start over.
はじめの2~3カ月は、途方に暮れていました。
そして、先輩方の期待にこたえることができず、受け取ったバトンを
落としてしまったとも思いました。
デビット・パッカードやボブ・ノイスと会って、
この失敗について、謝ろうと思いました。
シリコンバレーからも逃げようとも思いました。
でも、気がついたんです。
まだ、自分の手がけてきた仕事が好きだったことに気づいたんです。
Apple 社をクビになっても、その仕事を好きだったんです。
そこで、再スタートを切ったのです。
I didn’t see it then,
but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing
that could have ever happened to me.
The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again,
less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.
その時は理解できませんでしたが、いまになって思えば、Apple 社をクビになったのは、
人生において、良かったのです。
成功した人としてのプレッシャーがとれたんです。
そして、気軽な初心者になったのです。
もちろん、自信喪失はしましたけど。
そのかわり、創造的な人生がはじまったのです。
During the next five years, I started a company named NeXT,
another company named Pixar, and fell in love with an amazing woman who would become my wife.
Pixar went on to create the worlds first computer animated feature film,
Toy Story, and is now the most successful animation studio in the world.
In a remarkable turn of events, Apple bought NeXT,
I returned to Apple, and the technology we developed
at NeXT is at the heart of Apple’s current renaissance.
And Laurene and I have a wonderful family together.
その5年間で、NeXT 社とPixar 社をつくりました。
そして、いまの妻と恋に落ちたのです。
Pixar 社は、世界初のCGアニメ『Toy Story』で成功をおさめ、
世界最高のアニメスタジオが誕生したのです。(歓声、拍手)
意外なことに、Apple 社が NeXT 社を買収したのです。
結局、わたしは、クビになったApple 社に戻り、再建の道を歩み始めました。
NeXT 社で培った技術は、ルネッサンスを Apple 社に起こし、ロリーンとわたしは
幸せな生活を送ることができたのです。
I’m pretty sure none of this would have happened if I hadn’t been fired from Apple.
It was awful tasting medicine, but I guess the patient needed it.
Sometimes life hits you in the head with a brick.
Don’t lose faith. I’m convinced that the only thing that kept me going was that I loved what I did.
You’ve got to find what you love.
And that is as true for your work as it is for your lovers.
Your work is going to fill a large part of your life,
and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work.
And the only way to do great work is to love what you do.
If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle.
As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it.
And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on.
So keep looking until you find it. Don’t settle.
Apple 社をクビにならなかったら、何も起こらなかったでしょう。
とても辛い体験でしたが、必要だったことだと思います。
レンガで頭を殴れらるようなショックもときにはありますが、
自分を決して、見失わないことです。
わたしは、どんなことがあっても、自分の仕事を好きであり続けたので、
いままで、やってこれたと思います。
皆さんも、好きなことを見つけてください。仕事も恋人も同じことです。
あなたの人生の重要な位置を占める仕事に満足したいのなら、
最高の仕事をしていると自覚することです。
そして、最高の仕事を好きになってください。
まだ、見つかっていないのなら、
探してください。
ゆっくり構えていたらだめです。
直感が働きますから。
素晴らしい人間関係と同様に、長く付き合えば、良くなるものです。
だからこそ、探し求めるのです。(拍手)
My third story is about death.
When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like:
“If you live each day as if it was your last,
someday you’ll most certainly be right.”
It made an impression on me, and since then, for the past 33 years,
I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself:
“If today were the last day of my life,
would I want to do what I am about to do today?”
And whenever the answer has been “No” for too many days in a row,
I know I need to change something.
最後に『死』について。
17歳のときに出会った言葉があります。
『毎日、最期の日だとと思って生きなさい、いつか本当に最期の日がくるのだから』(笑)
この言葉に感銘を受け、33年間ずっと、毎朝、自問自答するのです。
『今日が最期の日だったら、しておかなければいけないことをしますか?』
その質問の答えが、『しません』だったら、何かを変える必要があることに気がつきます。
Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool
I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life.
Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride,
all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death,
leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way
I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose.
You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.
『すぐに死ぬ』という覚悟があるのなら、重要な決断をするときに
大きな自信となります。
その理由は、周りからの期待やプライドや失敗、恥をかくことへの恐れ、
それらすべて、死に直面すれば、消えてしまいます。
そこには、必要なものしか残りません。
死を覚悟して生きれば、
『何かを失う』気がする心配が無くなります。
本当は、みんなは裸なんです。
だからこそ、自分の心に素直になることが大切なのです。
About a year ago I was diagnosed with cancer.
I had a scan at 7:30 in the morning, and it clearly showed a tumor on my pancreas.
I didn’t even know what a pancreas was.
The doctors told me this was almost certainly a type of cancer that is incurable,
and that I should expect to live no longer than three to six months.
My doctor advised me to go home and get my affairs in order,
which is doctor’s code for prepare to die.
It means to try to tell your kids everything you thought you’d have the next 10 years
to tell them in just a few months.
It means to make sure everything is buttoned up
so that it will be as easy as possible for your family.
It means to say your goodbyes.
いまから一年前、癌を宣告されました。
CTスキャンを午前7時に受け、膵臓に癌があることが分かりました。
わたしは、膵臓のことも知りませんでした。
医者に治療ができないと言われ、余命3~6カ月と言われました。
医者から、家に帰ってやり残したことをしなさいとも言われました。
つまり、『死』への準備を始めなさいということだったのです。
このことは、10年間かけて、子どもたちに伝えようと思ったことを
この数カ月のうちに伝えておきなさいということでした。
家族に負担がかからないようにすべて、整理しておきなさいと。
それは、『死別(さようなら)』を意味していました。
I lived with that diagnosis all day.
Later that evening I had a biopsy, where they stuck an endoscope down my throat,
through my stomach and into my intestines,
put a needle into my pancreas and got a few cells from the tumor.
I was sedated, but my wife, who was there,
told me that when they viewed the cells under a microscope the doctors started crying
because it turned out to be a very rare form of pancreatic cancer that is curable with surgery.
I had the surgery and I’m fine now.
宣告を受けて一日が経ちました。
その日の夜、細胞検査を行いました。
結果は、治療のできるまれな癌ということがわかったのです。
手術を受け、今、私は元気になりました。(拍手)
This was the closest I’ve been to facing death,
and I hope it’s the closest I get for a few more decades.
Having lived through it,
I can now say this to you with a bit more certainty than when death was a useful
but purely intellectual concept:
これが、私が死に直面した体験です。
でも、数十年はまで生きていたいですね。
この体験を通して、言えることがあります。
No one wants to die.
Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there.
And yet death is the destination we all share.
No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be,
because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life.
It is Life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new.
Right now the new is you,
but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away.
Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true.
『誰も死にたいと思う人はいない。
 天国に行きたいと思う人でもそのために死ぬことはしない』(笑)
『死は、終着点で誰も逃れることはできないのです
 死は、生命の最大の発明なのです
 死は、年寄りを消し去ります
 死は、若者への道をつくります』
 若者=君たち
 でも、その若者は、年寄りになり消えていくのです。
 大げさかもしれないけど、真実なのです。
Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.
Don’t be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people’s thinking.
Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice.
And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition.
They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.
 時間は、有限です。
 他人の生き方に左右されないこと。
 ドグマにとらわれたらいけません。
 他人の意見に従うから、ドグマにとらわれるのです。
 他人の意見を聞かないように。
 どんなに聞き取れないような小さな自分の心の声でも聞き取ってください。
 一番大切なことは、直感に頼ることです。
 直感は、あなたが実現したいことを知っているのです。
 他のことは、どうでもよいのです。(拍手)
When I was young, there was an amazing publication called The Whole Earth Catalog,
which was one of the bibles of my generation.
It was created by a fellow named Stewart Brand not far from here in Menlo Park,
and he brought it to life with his poetic touch.
This was in the late 1960’s, before personal computers and desktop publishing,
so it was all made with typewriters, scissors,
and polaroid cameras. It was sort of like Google in paperback form,
35 years before Google came along: it was idealistic,
and overflowing with neat tools and great notions.
 わたしが若かったとき、『全地球カタログ』という本がありました。
 わたしの世代のバイブルです。
 スチュワート・ブランドという人が、メンローパークで制作しました。
 彼の詩的センスがその本にあふれていました。
 1960年代後半のことです。PC なんて、まだ、ありませんでした。
 タイプライター、ハサミ、ポラロイドなどでつくられていたのです。
 グーグルが誕生する35年前の
 グーグル・ペーパーバックと言ったらよいでしょうか。
 理想主義や新しいツールや信念が詰め込まれた本だったのです。
Stewart and his team put out several issues of The Whole Earth Catalog,
and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue.
It was the mid-1970s, and I was your age. On the back cover of their final issue
was a photograph of an early morning country road,
the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous.
Beneath it were the words:
“Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.”
最終巻が出たとき、それは、1970年代半ばでした。
私は、ちょうど、君たちと同じ年齢でした。
最終巻の裏表紙には、早朝の田舎道の写真があったのを覚えています。
ちょうど、ヒッチハイクをするような光景です。
その写真の下にこんな言葉があったんです。
“Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.” (貪欲でいなさい。馬鹿でいなさい)
It was their farewell message as they signed off.
それが、彼らの別れの言葉だったのです。
Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. (貪欲でいなさい。馬鹿でいなさい)
And I have always wished that for myself.
And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you.
わたしも常にそうでありたいと願っています。
そして、君たちもそうであってください。
Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.(貪欲でいなさい。馬鹿でいなさい)
Thank you all very much.
ここで、彼のスピーチはおしまいです。
これは、このURLに掲載されています。
Stanford Universityのサイトです。
If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you’ll most certainly be right.
『毎日を人生最後の日だと思って生きよう。
いつか本当にそうなる日が来る』
Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.
この二つのフレーズは忘れられません。
YOUTUBEの動画(スタンフォード大学がアップしています)は、こちらです ↓
広告

shimtake3 について

 中学の社会を教え始めました。  少し、今までやってきたことをまとめてみようか思っています。  練習問題をアップ、要点をまとめたものをアップしていきます。  たまに、私のエッセイもアップします。  私は、、、自然と本と映画をこよなく愛する一小市民です。 合言葉 : 地球のどこかであいましょう。 夢 : 南極でペンギンと一緒に隕石拾いをすること。 現実 : 中学校の先生です。しかも、『社会』です。 平成25年(2013)04月07日 更新
カテゴリー: つぶやき パーマリンク

Steve Jobs のスピーチ( Stanford University ) への1件のフィードバック

  1. shimtake3 より:

    いかがですか?

コメントを残す

以下に詳細を記入するか、アイコンをクリックしてログインしてください。

WordPress.com ロゴ

WordPress.com アカウントを使ってコメントしています。 ログアウト / 変更 )

Twitter 画像

Twitter アカウントを使ってコメントしています。 ログアウト / 変更 )

Facebook の写真

Facebook アカウントを使ってコメントしています。 ログアウト / 変更 )

Google+ フォト

Google+ アカウントを使ってコメントしています。 ログアウト / 変更 )

%s と連携中